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 Fake News Presents A Hazard To Reputations Of Clients & News Sources

PR allows the spokesperson to take a position on industry issues or announce news. The mixing of editorial with advertising may damage the reputation of firms that promote themselves or their position with "fake news." Ultimately, undermining the value of news sources – making readers or viewers question the validity of news – is bad for advertisers, spokespersons, and the media outlets that use fake news. So far, these questions have arisen only over video news releases.

Direct risks to the stations are: (1) The rules were prompted by payola scandals of the past, in which broadcasters accepted money from companies to hype their products without labeling the effort as advertising." and "If the FCC decides they have violated the rules, punishment could include fines or license revocation."

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 Suzanne Vega does virtual concert on Second Life

MMO's (Multi-Player Online) Game [or MMORPG ( Role Playing Games)] offer people to present themselves through an online environment via an avatar. I am fascinated by how businesses may eventually use this technology. It is clear that there is Real Money Trade (RMT) in online gaming, but not clear what transition will give us all the ability to do business through our avatar. In the mean time, it was nice to hear of this first live concert via avatar. Suzanne Vega (http://www.suzannevega.com) did this through The Infinite Mind (http://www.theinfinitemind.com) within the online gaming environment of Second Life (http://secondlife.com). There is a video clip of the concert at You Tube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R44vp4zeDUs). Wired covered this at http://www.wired.com/news/technology/internet/0,71593-0.html?tw=rss.index.
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URL: http://www.suzannevega.com
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URL: http://www.theinfinitemind.com
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URL: http://secondlife.com
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URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R44vp4zeDUs
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URL: http://www.wired.com/news/technology/internet/0,71593-0.html?tw=rss.index

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Nokia N80 Is a great mobile phone

I decided on my next mobile telephone, the Nokia N80 (http://www.nokia.com). It's a quad-band GSM phone with the full array of the top features that i wanted. First, it is a phone, not a computer shunk to the size of a handheld and using a computer user interface. Nokia's Symbian 60 series OS is designed for mobile phones and therefore nice to use. It has a great screen resolution and all the functionality that I view as useful. It has a radio and music player that I was surprised to find so useful and with good sound quality. The main functionalities I need are: the ability to synchcronize to my laptop's contact list and appointment calendar. I also needed (or wanted) occasional Web browsing, occasional e-mail, and a decent camera (3 megapixel). These all worked well, although I needed to download a third-party plugin for Apple iSync from nova media MDS GmbH (http://www.novamedia.de) for 9.99 Euros. I has many 3rd party apps for the Symbian OS, jumps on the local Wireless LAN (WLAN). There are some nice accessories I may get, such as wireless keyboard and Bluetooth headset, but for the moment the nice wired earpieces and microphone are what I need. This has excellent voice quality and signal strength. I prefer to order from my carrier (T-Mobile) or directly from Nokia, but I waited as long as I could stand and ordered a European unit. I considered the N73 (more camera, less business). The N80, unlike the N73, has document viewers, which I can used (although rarely). I think I'm way ahead of the obsolescence curve (the UPnP functionality is a example of why). I highly recommend this phone.