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Nokia N80 Is a great mobile phone

I decided on my next mobile telephone, the Nokia N80 (http://www.nokia.com). It's a quad-band GSM phone with the full array of the top features that i wanted. First, it is a phone, not a computer shunk to the size of a handheld and using a computer user interface. Nokia's Symbian 60 series OS is designed for mobile phones and therefore nice to use. It has a great screen resolution and all the functionality that I view as useful. It has a radio and music player that I was surprised to find so useful and with good sound quality. The main functionalities I need are: the ability to synchcronize to my laptop's contact list and appointment calendar. I also needed (or wanted) occasional Web browsing, occasional e-mail, and a decent camera (3 megapixel). These all worked well, although I needed to download a third-party plugin for Apple iSync from nova media MDS GmbH (http://www.novamedia.de) for 9.99 Euros. I has many 3rd party apps for the Symbian OS, jumps on the local Wireless LAN (WLAN). There are some nice accessories I may get, such as wireless keyboard and Bluetooth headset, but for the moment the nice wired earpieces and microphone are what I need. This has excellent voice quality and signal strength. I prefer to order from my carrier (T-Mobile) or directly from Nokia, but I waited as long as I could stand and ordered a European unit. I considered the N73 (more camera, less business). The N80, unlike the N73, has document viewers, which I can used (although rarely). I think I'm way ahead of the obsolescence curve (the UPnP functionality is a example of why). I highly recommend this phone.

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 Update on the Mobile Phone Pick: E-TEN M500 Pocket PC (EN)

BODY: This is a well-crafted device. However, I just was unable to get consistent reception via T-Mobile in north Atlanta. This is a great example of the potential pain of living on technology's bleeding edge – sometimes you bleed. I've sold that device over eBay (the Expansys return policy only provides for 15 days).

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 Still Hot On A New Mobile Phone

BODY: Well, if you read my posts about the ETEN, you know I got cut by the bleeding edge of tech. The issue was the phone's reception on the T-Mobile network. I did love my Samsung Palm device and before that a couple of Kyocera (Qualcomm) devices that also ran the PalmOS. Currently, there are a number of great devices running PocketPC, PalmOS, and Symbian variants that are very appealing. Of course, the most appealing – from SonyEricsson and Nokia – are not on the market, yet. In addition, they seem unlikely to hit the shores of the USA until later in 2006. The ability to sync contact lists, receive e-mail and text messages, and have some Web access are all features that I care about. A quad-band world-wide GSM phone is my preference, in large part because T-Mobile is least expensive and I do some traveling. A camera would be nice and there are many phones that include them. I don't think mobile phones are the right platform for video at this time. The video quality of phones – and even my Canon digital camera – is generally unacceptable for my purposes.

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 Sony PSP: Form factor & how not toupdate

If you have not held, turned on, and played with Sony's PSP – the feel, look, and incredible form factor are to behold. There is a sense of quality that is unusual in Consumer Electronics (CE) gear, especially for which a significant user audience is kids. Also, I find it fascinating that so much software is available for the PSP. So, this link may be useful. URL: HOW TO – not- update the PSP
http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2005/08/psp_20_update_d_1.html

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 Mobile Lines Overtake Landlines + + Evolution of Mobile Advertising

First, one should note this shift from landlines to mobile telephone lilnes, which is changing the basis of competition for traditional telecommunications carriers, Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers (ILEC) and Competitive Local Exchange Carriers (CLEC), alike. Higher end services, such as data, are now driving the thinking at the big carriers, which see their landline numbers declining. This is ironic for them I'm sure, because for a while people were adding lines for faxes and dial-up modems and they could hardly keep pace.

Second, my comment on Mobile Advertising is that conceptually it has been around for a while. The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) has had a special interest group with many sessions. Map data providers, integrators, and advertisers have developed the applications that now dot in-vehicle map systems and Web-based map-related, sponsored advertising links, such as you find on Mapquest, Google Maps, or Weather.com. However, as I walk down the street with a Palm, Pocket PC, or other data-capable mobile phone – I don't go out of my way to get it today. So, we'll see how compelling this becomes. URL: Evolution of Mobile Advertising

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 Skype & Mobility

BODY: IP-based (Internet Protocol) telephony is certain to overtake switched-circuit telephony. Skype leads in the number of Voice over IP (VoIP) users and certainly has a global reach. Mobile telephone handsets will eventually communicate via IP. Now, there are some handsets, notably from Nokia, that are WiFi and coming as WiMax, and which also have switched circuit capability. In addition, Nokia's 770, a Linux OS tablet for about US$350 and WiFi, shows the possibility of these devices becoming phones. In fact the 770 looks a little like the 7100, which has no WiFi capability. T-Mobile and others, such as around Cleveland OH (thanks to my CASE alumni news) are building hotspots and ubiquitous WiFi coverage that portends a future of wireless IP communications that will include voice.

So, yes I need a new handset. My Samsung, Palm OS phone no longer accepts input via the stylus. Unfortunately, I'll have to wait for the handset of my dreams. The best for the moment might be a handheld mobile-phone-PDA with WiFi and switched circuit calling that runs the Skype application on Microsoft's Pocket PC (PPC) Operating System (OS). There are some photos on the Web of the Skype founder/CEO using such a device. HTC (Taiwan) makes some nice devices, but US wireless carriers, such as Sprint don't offer the WiFi version (guess why?), because you can bypass the carrier via the local wireless connection, in this case WiFi. Verizon Wireless was also taken to task on this issue, disabling the bluetooth in a handset it carries, so that subscribers have to send photos over the carriers own network rather than locally to the user's PC with bluetooth.

Is it just me, or do suppliers try to impress you with features you don't really use, such as still or video cameras, mp3 players, etc? My iPod Photo is just fine for music, as are my respective cameras for video and still photography. OK, after a little online searching the QDA700 from qoollabs.com is the closest to what I have and looks nice, just that I can't buy it yet. Also, I discovered that Sprint's replacement the Samsung i550 was canceled and that Samsung's i539 Smartphone will get launched in China. Well, the Siemens SX66 looks pretty sweet, but I'm gonna look again later.

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 Mobile Phone Pick: E-TEN M500 Pocket PC (EN)

Well, after investigation to the point of no return, I decided on an E-TEN M500 Pocket PC (EN). You can't actually buy them from a US carrier, but Expansys has every new toy that any bleeding edge technology adopter could ever want. Gladly, I only need one phone cause there are so many good ones.

I got it for the ability to accept a card with WiFi (802.11b/g access to run Skype (note, below), possiblly upgrade to Microsoft Windows Mobile 5.0, small, and it looked cool. I haven't used a keyboard input on a handheld since my HP 95 LX (ran DOS), so I opted not to get a device with a keypad and no keypad/keyboard makes the device much smaller.

I'm consolidating accounts at T-Mobile for price-especially with any data package (want to pay $0.25 each to e-mail a photo and no WiFi, then pick Cingular), decent coverage, and roaming WiFi access. I don't believe it is likely that Deutche Telekom would sell T-Mobile (other recent blog posts, so I decided not to worry about it.

I admit that PalmOS and synchronization of address book information has always worked. If you are over 40, you might like a bigger screen than the Samsung i-500 (PalmOS) or i-600 (Pocket PC = PPC). My i-500's screen stopped accepting input from the stylus, so its time to change.

Previously, I posted this on "Skype & Mobility" IP-based (Internet Protocol) telephony is certain to overtake switched-circuit telephony. Skype leads in the number of Voice over IP (VoIP) users and certainly has a global reach. Mobile telephone handsets will eventually communicate via IP.

Now, there are some handsets, notably from Nokia, that are WiFi and coming as WiMax, and which also have switched circuit capability. In addition, Nokia's 770, a Linux OS tablet for about US$350 and WiFi, shows the possibility of these devices becoming phones. In fact the 770 looks a little like the 7100, which has no WiFi capability. T-Mobile and others, such as around Cleveland OH (thanks to my CASE alumni news) are building hotspots and ubiquitous WiFi coverage that portends a future of wireless IP communications that will include voice. So, yes I need a new handset.

My Samsung, Palm OS phone no longer accepts input via the stylus. Unfortunately, I'll have to wait for the handset of my dreams. The best for the moment might be a handheld mobile-phone-PDA with WiFi and switched circuit calling that runs the Skype application on Microsoft's Pocket PC (PPC) Operating System (OS). There are some photos on the Web of the Skype founder/CEO using such a device. HTC (Taiwan) makes some nice devices, but US wireless carriers, such as Sprint don't offer the WiFi version (guess why?), because you can bypass the carrier via the local wireless connection, in this case WiFi. Verizon Wireless was also taken to task on this issue, disabling the bluetooth in a handset it carries, so that subscribers have to send photos over the carriers own network rather than locally to the user's PC with bluetooth.

Is it just me, or do suppliers try to impress you with features you don't really use, such as still or video cameras, mp3 players, etc? My iPod Photo is just fine for music, as are my respective cameras for video and still photography. OK, after a little online searching the QDA700 from qoollabs.com is the closest to what I have and looks nice, just that I can't buy it yet. Also, I discovered that Sprint's replacement the Samsung i550 was canceled and that Samsung's i539 Smartphone will get launched in China. Well, the Siemens SX66 looks pretty sweet, but I'm gonna look again later.
** Note: Sprint just picked up a new PalmOS phone with keyboard input.