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 Update on the Mobile Phone Pick: E-TEN M500 Pocket PC (EN)

BODY: This is a well-crafted device. However, I just was unable to get consistent reception via T-Mobile in north Atlanta. This is a great example of the potential pain of living on technology's bleeding edge – sometimes you bleed. I've sold that device over eBay (the Expansys return policy only provides for 15 days).

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 Still Hot On A New Mobile Phone

BODY: Well, if you read my posts about the ETEN, you know I got cut by the bleeding edge of tech. The issue was the phone's reception on the T-Mobile network. I did love my Samsung Palm device and before that a couple of Kyocera (Qualcomm) devices that also ran the PalmOS. Currently, there are a number of great devices running PocketPC, PalmOS, and Symbian variants that are very appealing. Of course, the most appealing – from SonyEricsson and Nokia – are not on the market, yet. In addition, they seem unlikely to hit the shores of the USA until later in 2006. The ability to sync contact lists, receive e-mail and text messages, and have some Web access are all features that I care about. A quad-band world-wide GSM phone is my preference, in large part because T-Mobile is least expensive and I do some traveling. A camera would be nice and there are many phones that include them. I don't think mobile phones are the right platform for video at this time. The video quality of phones – and even my Canon digital camera – is generally unacceptable for my purposes.

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 Complexity causes half of product returns?

BODY: This article, reported by Reuters and the San Jose Mercury News' Good Morning Silicon Valley, was most interesting for the cause. The origin of most flaws was in the first phase of the product design process (product or requirements definition). This supports my conviction that, as Euripides said, "a bad beginning makes a bad ending." Elke den Ouden reported the results in her thesis at the Technical University of Eindhoven, The Netherlands. From Reuters:

URL: http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=oddlyEnoughNews&storyID=2006-03-07T125820Z_01_L06746423_RTRUKOC_0_US-COMPLEXITY-PRODUCTRETURNS.xml&archived=False

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 Personal Data Thefts Top 50 Million in 6 Months

Theft of data is a real and growing issue for individuals in the United States and around the world. This link lists the compromised data sources and the cause, just since the ChoicePoint breach of 15 February 2005. http://www.privacyrights.org/ar/ChronDataBreaches.htm This listing, compiled by the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, shows that more that the personal privacy data of more than 50 million US citizens has been compromised in this period of barely more than 6 months.

http://www.privacyrights.org/ar/ChronDataBreaches.htm

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 Awareness of Blogging & RSS Low, reports Pew Internet Trust

The Pew Internet Trust issued a report that finds low understanding of the terminology surrounding the technology industry. Examples words that are not well understood, include: podcasting and RSS. New methods of generating awareness of your technology offerings may be readily available through these relatively new methods.
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URL: http://pewresearch.org/pubs/206/trends-2005
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URL: http://www.pewinternet.org/

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 Sony PSP: Form factor & how not toupdate

If you have not held, turned on, and played with Sony's PSP – the feel, look, and incredible form factor are to behold. There is a sense of quality that is unusual in Consumer Electronics (CE) gear, especially for which a significant user audience is kids. Also, I find it fascinating that so much software is available for the PSP. So, this link may be useful. URL: HOW TO – not- update the PSP
http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2005/08/psp_20_update_d_1.html

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 Mobile Lines Overtake Landlines + + Evolution of Mobile Advertising

First, one should note this shift from landlines to mobile telephone lilnes, which is changing the basis of competition for traditional telecommunications carriers, Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers (ILEC) and Competitive Local Exchange Carriers (CLEC), alike. Higher end services, such as data, are now driving the thinking at the big carriers, which see their landline numbers declining. This is ironic for them I'm sure, because for a while people were adding lines for faxes and dial-up modems and they could hardly keep pace.

Second, my comment on Mobile Advertising is that conceptually it has been around for a while. The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) has had a special interest group with many sessions. Map data providers, integrators, and advertisers have developed the applications that now dot in-vehicle map systems and Web-based map-related, sponsored advertising links, such as you find on Mapquest, Google Maps, or Weather.com. However, as I walk down the street with a Palm, Pocket PC, or other data-capable mobile phone – I don't go out of my way to get it today. So, we'll see how compelling this becomes. URL: Evolution of Mobile Advertising