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 On “CBS News Unveils Web Strategy”

On "CBS News Unveils Web Strategy." Television broadcasters have enjoyed continuing streams of revenues from advertising – even increasing streams, even after these are proving less effective for advertisers. Viewership clearly is fractured, no longer just three (anyone remember?) or four television/video channels. In addition, online everything – Web, new media (video), VoIP, chat, and gaming – are all compelling, non-TV activities that are capturing majorities of some demographic segments (=young males).

So, as advertisers slowly make their way to more compelling and effective alternatives to television advertising, it is not surprising to see that some TV broadcasters have noticed and are doing something about it.

The jury is still out on the ability of the broadcasting industry to adjust to disruptive competition.

CBS still must be sensitive to competing with local affiliates and cable operators. Plus, Web-based content must fit an audience that CBS wishes to serve.

The Web visitor that CBS wants to reach is not in today's TV viewer demographic. Or if this CBS Web visitor is in the current market, then what new demographic do they reach out to and capture. Is it a strategy to stop the bleeding? Of ad revenues? Of viewership? It is difficult to imagine that CBS can stop a migration away from the perception of one-size-fits-all content. The ability to tailor your feed of "one-size-fits-all content" will not capture new markets, stem the flow of viewers and advertising dollars to other media or different, Web-based content.

I wish CBS well, but we'll see what happens.

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URL: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/07/12/entertainment/main708433.shtml
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URL: http://www.paidcontent.org/pc/arch/2005_07_12.shtml#014766

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 Skype & Mobility

BODY: IP-based (Internet Protocol) telephony is certain to overtake switched-circuit telephony. Skype leads in the number of Voice over IP (VoIP) users and certainly has a global reach. Mobile telephone handsets will eventually communicate via IP. Now, there are some handsets, notably from Nokia, that are WiFi and coming as WiMax, and which also have switched circuit capability. In addition, Nokia's 770, a Linux OS tablet for about US$350 and WiFi, shows the possibility of these devices becoming phones. In fact the 770 looks a little like the 7100, which has no WiFi capability. T-Mobile and others, such as around Cleveland OH (thanks to my CASE alumni news) are building hotspots and ubiquitous WiFi coverage that portends a future of wireless IP communications that will include voice.

So, yes I need a new handset. My Samsung, Palm OS phone no longer accepts input via the stylus. Unfortunately, I'll have to wait for the handset of my dreams. The best for the moment might be a handheld mobile-phone-PDA with WiFi and switched circuit calling that runs the Skype application on Microsoft's Pocket PC (PPC) Operating System (OS). There are some photos on the Web of the Skype founder/CEO using such a device. HTC (Taiwan) makes some nice devices, but US wireless carriers, such as Sprint don't offer the WiFi version (guess why?), because you can bypass the carrier via the local wireless connection, in this case WiFi. Verizon Wireless was also taken to task on this issue, disabling the bluetooth in a handset it carries, so that subscribers have to send photos over the carriers own network rather than locally to the user's PC with bluetooth.

Is it just me, or do suppliers try to impress you with features you don't really use, such as still or video cameras, mp3 players, etc? My iPod Photo is just fine for music, as are my respective cameras for video and still photography. OK, after a little online searching the QDA700 from qoollabs.com is the closest to what I have and looks nice, just that I can't buy it yet. Also, I discovered that Sprint's replacement the Samsung i550 was canceled and that Samsung's i539 Smartphone will get launched in China. Well, the Siemens SX66 looks pretty sweet, but I'm gonna look again later.

0

 Mobile Phone Pick: E-TEN M500 Pocket PC (EN)

Well, after investigation to the point of no return, I decided on an E-TEN M500 Pocket PC (EN). You can't actually buy them from a US carrier, but Expansys has every new toy that any bleeding edge technology adopter could ever want. Gladly, I only need one phone cause there are so many good ones.

I got it for the ability to accept a card with WiFi (802.11b/g access to run Skype (note, below), possiblly upgrade to Microsoft Windows Mobile 5.0, small, and it looked cool. I haven't used a keyboard input on a handheld since my HP 95 LX (ran DOS), so I opted not to get a device with a keypad and no keypad/keyboard makes the device much smaller.

I'm consolidating accounts at T-Mobile for price-especially with any data package (want to pay $0.25 each to e-mail a photo and no WiFi, then pick Cingular), decent coverage, and roaming WiFi access. I don't believe it is likely that Deutche Telekom would sell T-Mobile (other recent blog posts, so I decided not to worry about it.

I admit that PalmOS and synchronization of address book information has always worked. If you are over 40, you might like a bigger screen than the Samsung i-500 (PalmOS) or i-600 (Pocket PC = PPC). My i-500's screen stopped accepting input from the stylus, so its time to change.

Previously, I posted this on "Skype & Mobility" IP-based (Internet Protocol) telephony is certain to overtake switched-circuit telephony. Skype leads in the number of Voice over IP (VoIP) users and certainly has a global reach. Mobile telephone handsets will eventually communicate via IP.

Now, there are some handsets, notably from Nokia, that are WiFi and coming as WiMax, and which also have switched circuit capability. In addition, Nokia's 770, a Linux OS tablet for about US$350 and WiFi, shows the possibility of these devices becoming phones. In fact the 770 looks a little like the 7100, which has no WiFi capability. T-Mobile and others, such as around Cleveland OH (thanks to my CASE alumni news) are building hotspots and ubiquitous WiFi coverage that portends a future of wireless IP communications that will include voice. So, yes I need a new handset.

My Samsung, Palm OS phone no longer accepts input via the stylus. Unfortunately, I'll have to wait for the handset of my dreams. The best for the moment might be a handheld mobile-phone-PDA with WiFi and switched circuit calling that runs the Skype application on Microsoft's Pocket PC (PPC) Operating System (OS). There are some photos on the Web of the Skype founder/CEO using such a device. HTC (Taiwan) makes some nice devices, but US wireless carriers, such as Sprint don't offer the WiFi version (guess why?), because you can bypass the carrier via the local wireless connection, in this case WiFi. Verizon Wireless was also taken to task on this issue, disabling the bluetooth in a handset it carries, so that subscribers have to send photos over the carriers own network rather than locally to the user's PC with bluetooth.

Is it just me, or do suppliers try to impress you with features you don't really use, such as still or video cameras, mp3 players, etc? My iPod Photo is just fine for music, as are my respective cameras for video and still photography. OK, after a little online searching the QDA700 from qoollabs.com is the closest to what I have and looks nice, just that I can't buy it yet. Also, I discovered that Sprint's replacement the Samsung i550 was canceled and that Samsung's i539 Smartphone will get launched in China. Well, the Siemens SX66 looks pretty sweet, but I'm gonna look again later.
** Note: Sprint just picked up a new PalmOS phone with keyboard input.